Sunday, 6 March 2016

Globecooking recipe : Sorrel Totoes (Jamaica)

This is a recipe from a Jamaican-themed Kitchen Trotter box from over a year ago, that I never got round to making because it didn't really appeal to me. I found the little pot of sorrel jam when rummaging through the cupboard and decided to give them a go. They were actually a big hit so I'll be making them again. These are the quantities from their recipe but I'd double up next time because it was quite small and it all disappeared within 24 hours !

Sorrel is apparently the most common flower in Jamaica and it is used for making a festive drink, as well as jams, teas and cordials. The sorrel jam has a sweet but tart flavour. On the back of the jar, it says it can be used to accompany meat and poultry, which makes sense as it's a bit similar to cranberry sauce. You could use any jam for the recipe though.

Sorrel Totoes

ingredients :

130g plain flour
1tsp baking powder
1tsp cinnamon
1/2tsp nutmeg
75g caster sugar
45g brown sugar
1 egg
1tsp vanilla essence
30g butter
60ml water

Mix the water, flour, baking powder, cinnamon and nutmeg in a bowl. 

In a separate bowl, cream together the butter and the sugars. 

Crack in the egg and add the vanilla essence.

Mix the two together.

Pour into a greased 20cm cake tin. Mine was too big so I had to adapt with foil.

Cook for 30 minutes at 180° until nicely browned on top. Leave to cool on a wire rack. 

Slice in half horizontally. Spread with sorrel jam and sandwich together again.

Cut into squares and serve. They have a firm, slightly nutty flavour which is nicely offset by the sweet but sharp jam.

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  1. Just made this. It's very sweet, but rather good. My husband is just going back for thirds. I misunderstood the recipe and put spoonfuls of jam on top before I baked it, which seemed to work.
    As I had no sorrel jam, I used homemade blackcurrant jelly, thinking it offered the required mix of sweet and tart flavours